National Federation of Health “Health Awareness Conference” 25 Feb 2012

I attended the National Federation of Health’s (NFH’s) “Health Awarness Conference” on Saturday 25 Feb 2011.

I’d never heard of the NFH before, but decided to attend because one of the speakers was Barbara Wren whom my nutritionist had trained under.

It turns out that the NFH are an international nonprofit, consumer organisation working to protect individuals’ rights to choose to consume healthy food, take supplements, and use alternative therapies without government restrictions.  Sounds good so far, but what was the day like?

Barbara Wren was the first speaker.  She is the author of “Cellular Awakening“, which focuses on how your body holds and creates light and how light controls all the body’s functions. 

Amongst other things, she talked about the blood-brain barrier and how we had to nourish it using Iodine, DHA from Omega 3 and Vitamin D3.  If the blood-brain barrier works, then the body functions properly.  The talk was in essence, a distillation of her 40 years’ of practice as a naturopath and filled with interesting tips and observations.

The second speaker was Clive  de Carle of The Solutions Clinic – a health and longevity researcher and educator.  He was led into health when he developed rheumatoid arthritis but cured himself using natural methods.  He talked about the importance of fulvic minerals, celtic salt, colloidal silver, ozone generators, the use of vitamin D3 to reduce cancer risk.  He also had a frequency device based on Tesla’s research that was going to be demonstrated, as it had anecdotal evidence of helping to heal cancer, and I was hoping to use it.  In the end due to time pressures, the device was not shown and I was gutted.

Ian Crane followed.  My impression of him was that he was a conspiracy-theorist, because he talk focused on exposing how Big Farmer (i.e. huge food producing organisations) are trying to control what we eat and that Big Pharma are trying to stamp out our right to herbal supplements.  Yet he did produce convincing evidence that this is happening.  One was the ssristories.com website which is a database containing all the incidences of negative effects of psychoactive pharamaceuticals, e.g. where taking anti-depressants had led to suicides or deaths.  There were over 48,000 documented cases of adverse effects, including deaths.  This from a drug that was properly-prescribed by the medical profession.  Of course, it could be argued that the people who were on SSRIs were already pre-disposed to take negative action, but seeing the medication was supposed to have helped them, it made a strong case for arguing against the ban against natural herbs which have not caused as many deaths.

The fourth speaker was Scott Tips, President of the NHF.  He was one of the best speakers that day because he was reasoned yet passionate about what he was achieving for the protection of consumers and their right to supplements and alternative treatments.  An attorney by training, he knew his supplements and healthcare.  He was also instrumental in ensuring that the recommended daily allowance for vitamin C was not lowered in a meeting of the Codex Alimentarius.  The current RDA for Vitamin C is 60mg/day.  The delegate who wanted it lowered chose a level that was arbitrary, because it was the half-way point of preventing scurvy and optimal tissue saturation!  But as Scott Tips pointed out:  you shouldn’t do life and death with RDAs.  You should do optimal life.

For those not in the know (and that included me), the Codex Alimentarius is a world-wide organisation that standardises rules on food and supplements.  Not all the countries and delegates who attend the Codex Alimentarius are as knowledgeable about what works and what doesn’t.  So the NFH, in its quest to protect consumer is definitely an organisation to support.

The final speaker was Fabian Piorkowsky who is an independent health advisor and health coach who had also trained for three years with a shaman in the Amazon.  He talked about the health benefits, history of cultured foods and how to make your own.  Cultured foods include yoghurt, bread, kefir and kombucha.  He had a background in science, so was interested in the science behind what happened in fermentation.  Fermentation done properly results in food that is easier to digest, creates Omega 3 and DHA, Vitamin B.  It also causes good bacteria to proliferate, and these include pro-biotics.  As 80% of our immune system is in the digestive system in the form of microflora, this is important.  Pro-biotics such as lactobacillus can also produce anti-carcinogenic agents.

An interesting tip:  don’t take supplements with unfermented grains (and this includes bread which is usually made with unfermented grains) as this bindsd the supplements and it is then excreted.

I have to say that he was a living testimonial to what he preached – he was, to my eye, the most healthy-looking speaker!  I’ve made kefir and also kombucha, and I found them easy to make.  My only regret is that I’ve been told that I can’t have these ferments on my anti-cancer diet as traditionally kefir is made from milk (and dairy is a no-no), and kombucha is acidic (and cancer thrives in an acidic environment).  He did mention culturing kefir in coconut water, so maybe that’s something to look into.

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