Recurrence Rollercoaster – #1 – Why Tamoxifen didn’t work for me

Emotional-Roller-Coaster-Ride

So, for newcomers, a quick recap of the back story:  I had a mastectomy, and when I woke up from surgery, discovered my left arm was paralysed.  This had been caused by damage to the brachial plexus nerve that controls the arm.  I had to have further surgery to free the injured nerves.

It took about nine months before I was finally able to lift my left arm, and control it.  It was a dark time, and I remember being in a state of numbness most of the time.  I still look back on that period with a sense of incredulity, and amazement that I got through it.

In those nine months, to give my arm the best chance of healing, my surgeon and I took the decision not to have any active treatment in case they damaged the nerves.  I was also hoping that the treatments I’d had at Hallwang Private Oncology Clinic in Germany would help.

tamoxifen-blocks-estrogen-receptors

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The Brachial plexus Chronicles #2 – 3 weeks later – C7 returns

[continuing the saga of what happened after my mastectomy, when I woke up from surgery to find that my left arm was paralysed.  I apologise if this seems like wallowing in the experience, but I’m writing this partly as therapy, and also for any other poor bugger who has to go through what I did.  I remember hunting on the internet for similar experiences, to discover there was nothing.  This was totally outside the realm of most mastectomy patients.  Hopefully anyone going through the same will walk with me and know what to expect and know you are not alone!]

Electromyography without the Sound Effects. photo credit: faithmedical.com

Three weeks after the mastectomy, I had to go back to the hospital for another electromyography (EMG), a type of muscle test.

A needle is inserted through the skin into the muscle tissue.  This needle is connected to an oscilloscope that measures the activity of the nerve.

On this second visit, I asked to see the results from the test conducted two days after the mastectomy.  For some reason, although I had asked (and so had the physiotherapist), the results were not made available which made me very suspicious.

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Fulda 2013 conference #5: Oxidative stress and the EDIM (tumour-marker) test (Dr Michael Schoenberg)

(This talk was given in Fulda in Dec 2013, and delivered in German, with a simultaneous English translation, so apologies if I misunderstood any of the translation, and for the sparseness of my notes)

ChristmasMarket5

The Christmas market at Fulda

Dr Schoneberg studied Roman Catholic Theology and philosophy in Halle and Erfurt, and was a Catholic Priest in Erfurt.  He subsequently studied medicine at Martin-Luther University in Halle-Wittenberg.  He is a medical specialist in surgery in Frankfurt, and holds a doctorate in medicine.  He is medical director for emergency medical services, and also senior emergency physician.  He runs a private medical clinic for alternative medicine.

http://www.dr-schoneberg.de

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The aim of the talk was to show the relationship between a set of diagnostic tumour-marker tests, the EDIM, and oxidative stress in the human body.  These tests are not the usual conventional markers.  They enable the practitioner to track whether or not treatments are successful in reducing oxidative stress in the body.

What is the EDIM tumour-marker test?

EDIM is an acronym for Epitope Detection In Monocytes.  It is a set of two diagnostic tests that are alternatives to conventional tumour markers.  These two EDIM tests are the TKTL1 and Apo10 blood tests.  Research conducted into these tests seem to indicate that they can show early signs of metastasis even when established tumour markers and clinical signs and imaging (like Pet Scans) do not do so.

EDIMtests

image credit: tarvarlin.com

Apo10 is a specific tumour protein that is not normally detectable in normal cells.  TKTL1 stands for Transketolase-like 1 enzyme.  Cancer cells display high levels of glycolysis (rapid fermentation of glucose) a process which is also known as the Warburg effect – it’s what enables cancer cells to survive in the absence of oxygen.  Lactic acid is also produced by cancer cells, even in the presence of oxygen.  The lactic acid also protects the cancer cell from the body’s immune system.  The TKTL1 enzyme is responsible for this effect.

http://www.tktl1.de/?Introduction

http://www.tavarlin.com/downloads/2009PosterFIGO.pdf

http://www.tavarlin.com/downloads/FutureOncology.pdf

What is oxidative stress and its relation to redox reactions? (adapted from wikipedia)

A Redox reaction is an amalgamation of two processes:  a reduction and oxidation.  Substances that have the ability to reduce other substances (cause them to gain electrons) are said to be reductive or reducing and are known as reducing agents, reductants, or reducers..  Substances that have the ability to oxidize other substances (cause them to lose electrons) are said to be oxidative or oxidizing.

An example of oxidisation is rusting (oxygen causes the iron to rust).

An example of a redox process is photosynthesis in plants which involves the reduction of carbon dioxide into sugars and the oxidation of water into molecular oxygen.

Free radical reactions are redox reactions that occur as a part of homeostasis and killing microorganisms, where an electron detaches from a molecule and then reattaches almost instantaneously. Free radicals are a part of redox molecules and can become harmful to the human body if they do not reattach to the redox molecule or an antioxidant. Unsatisfied free radicals can spur the mutation of cells they encounter and are, thus, causes of cancer.

What is the relationship between oxidative stress and redox reactions?

Oxidative stress reflects an imbalance between a system’s ability to manage redox and any resulting damage. Disturbances in the normal redox state of cells can cause toxic effects through the production of peroxides and free radicals that damage all components of the cell, including proteins, lipids, and DNA. Thus, oxidative stress can cause disruptions in normal mechanisms of cellular signaling.

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According to Dr Schoneberg, therapies to correct oxidative stress include:

  • High dose Vitamin C and Alpha-Lipoic Acid
  • Polyphenols
  • Yoga, Tai Chi, meditation

There is a special type of oxidative stress called Nitrosativer Stress involving free radical nitric oxide (NO) and peroxynitrite derived product.

The Coy protocol uses the EDIM tests to monitor the effectiveness of treatments.  The Coy diet includes:

  • Tocotrienol (natural Vitamin E)
  • Carbohydrate reduction in the diet (1g/kg of bodyweight)
  • Omega 3 (10g/kg)
  • MCT oil
  • Lactate (to dissolve the coat around the tumour)
  • Polyphenols

Mastectomy #8D: When disaster strikes (Part 4) … nerve tests

Preface – Why I write about my mastectomy. 

Mastectomy T-shirt1

Yep, been there … done that …

Before my mastectomy, in the search for reassurance, I scoured the internet for first person experiences.  

Some of the posts I read left me reeling, and thinking “there but for the Grace of God …”.  

And yet I read on, devouring the suffering (just as passers-by rubber-neck a traffic accident), because it was strangely addictive, a bit like porn (except no one deliberately goes through a mastectomy to make money!)

[I never thought that I would someday join this group of exclusive women in providing my own personal horror story.]

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Save your lives: get your thyroids and port veins checked by ultrasound! (a session with Prof. Marco Ruggiero)

Updated March 2016 – For more information on GcMAF, please join the GcMAF and GcMAF Cancer forums on Facebook – they are closed groups, so you have to wait for your membership to be confirmed.  They contain up-to-date information on sources of GcMAF, and also feedback and contributions  by people who are using GcMAF.

[GcMAF can be obtained from Sansei-Mirai or ImmuneBiotech.  I’ve heard that the Sansei-Mirai product is very potent and stable.]

I was recently privileged to witness Professor Dr. Marco Ruggiero demonstrate his expertise in conducting ultrasound scans (or sonography as it is known on Continental Europe).

I was familiar with ultrasounds conducted on tumours, but in the hands of a master, it can reveal conditions not clinically evident in blood tests, thus providing an early signpost for more in-depth testing and treatment.

Thyroid ultrasound

Image credit: endocrinesurgery.ucla.edu

I’ve previously always posted about Professor Ruggiero as the genius behind GcMAF.  He is also a trained clinical radiologist and uses ultrasound to measure the success of GcMAF treatments.  This was the first time I saw him demonstrate his mastery in ultrasound scans.

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Supplement: GcMAF

Macrophage1

Macrophage eating cancer cell (photo from http://www.gcmaf.eu/info/)

Updated March 2016 – For more information on GcMAF, please join the GcMAF and GcMAF Cancer forums on Facebook – they are closed groups, so you have to wait for your membership to be confirmed.  They contain up-to-date information on sources of GcMAF, and also feedback and contributions  by people who are using GcMAF.

this post has helped you, please would you help me?  I am now fundraising for cancer treatments at GoFundMe http://www.gofundme.com/78jh2w or at JustGiving:  https://www.justgiving.com/goBananasforRona

JustGiving - Sponsor me now!

[update 7 Dec 2013 – see post on Fulda integrative conference on possible reason why GcMAF did not work for me]

Updated 22 Feb 2014:  please note that the process for culturing Maf314 is different from Bravo Probiotic.  I suggest that if you want to do it properly, that you buy a fresh set of cultures from Bravo as only they can guarantee the activity of the cultures.  Compound 1 must be cultured afresh from powder each time.  Compound 2 can be re-propagated from the existing culture. 

When I was trying to find another weapon to beat the cancer, I used GcMAF for about three months.

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The IV C files #5 – Q: “Should I try intravenous vitamin C as a cure for cancer?”

Updated 10 November 2013

If you’ve been following my blog, you’ll know that IV C did not work for me.

In fact, so far I’ve only come across two women with breast tumours (that were cancerous) for whom it worked – they are still alive and in remission more than 5 years later.

I also met a man who used IV C for lung tumours – they shrank.  But he also had a squamous cell carcinoma that had developed from a tumour on his tonsil – and that did not respond to IV C.

I met a woman who had 3 tumours in her breast – one shrank, one grew and one vanished through IV C.

So as you can see, it seems a bit hit-and-miss.

If you’re asking yourself:  “should I do IV C?” then the following will guide you:

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Complementary treatments: how to choose one that works

Although I’ve selected intravenous vitamin C on the basis that it seemed to offer scientific evidence to back up its efficacy as well as a track record of working, I’ve come to realise that selecting a complementary cancer treatment is quite hit-and-miss really.

Today I came across the best explanation for why some complementary therapies for cancer may work for some people and not others from the alternative cancer treatment website: http://alternativecancer.us/

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