Hallwang Clinic #15 – Some lessons learned and helpful tips

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The bus-stop at Hallwang

Updated March 2016 – For more information on GcMAF, please join the GcMAF and GcMAF Cancer forums on Facebook – they are closed groups, so you have to wait for your membership to be confirmed.  They contain up-to-date information on sources of GcMAF, and also feedback and contributions  by people who are using GcMAF.

Updated 1 January, 2015 re. the importance of having a companion when you go for the trans-arterial chemoembolisation procedure with Professor Vogl in Frankfurt.

 

Here is a summary of my experiences which includes information on how to get to Hallwang Private Oncology Clinic, accommodation, a few other bits-and-bobs which didn’t fit into the posts I wrote previously, and how to send an enquiry.

Some people have accused me of being biased in favour Hallwang, and it’s true that I haven’t been to any other German cancer clinic, so there may be an element of truth there.

However, my experience at Hallwang was largely positive [apart from encounters with pointy sharp things] and as far as anyone can enjoy an experience in a cancer clinic, I was blessed in my stay there by the magnificent staff, the doctors, and the support, laughs and camaraderie of the patients there.  Had I gone there on my own, it may not have been such an uplifting stay.

Also, I met a few people who had been to other cancer clinics around the world (including other German clinics and Mexican clinics), and they had positive things to say about Hallwang.  One of the patient’s wives, a very gracious Southern-type belle from California with exacting standards said: “My god, Hallwang is like a spa!  If you wanna get cancer, get it at Hallwang!”

It’s therefore up to you, the reader, to do your research if you’re thinking of going to a German cancer clinic.  There are many clinics in Germany, and all of them have their good and bad points, and none is perfect.

23 July 2014:  Before you go to a German cancer clinic, get written confirmation from them that the chief doctor, or an oncologist will be on-site for the length of your stay.  This applies to any clinic which is dependent on a “star” doctor, and Hallwang which is currently going through staffing changes.

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What do you do after breast cancer? Listen to this talk on: “Surviving Survival”

What do you do after surviving breast cancer?

Grace Gawler, a cancer strategist with 38 years of experience and more than 14,000 clients, and the author of one of the first books (Women of Silence:  The Emotional Healing of Cancer) on the emotional and psychological impact of breast cancer

What I’ve found useful whenever I’ve had a consultation with Grace, is her blend of knowledge and experience of treatments and the psychology of cancer patients.  She’s also someone who’s gone through a serious illness, so she knows just what it takes to weather the storms of a life-threatening illness.  It is that level of empathy that makes her unique in her services and someone I feel I can talk to because she truly understands!

In this radio show, Grace talks about surviving survival.Two key areas she covers are:  (1) the void that is created after the flurry of treatment stops and the gap between monitoring visits to the specialist doctor widens (2) the what-if phase after treatment … “what if the cancer recurs?”

With patients living longer, women often have impaired life quality and declining well-being after breast cancer.  The wounds are often unseen. Surviving Survival is about the need to become an alchemist, transforming the threat of losing our life, to helping us find our life!

http://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/73580/surviving-survival-navigating-the-breast-cancer-maze

Hallwang Clinic #11 – Meltdowns, downtime and handholding

Update 5 February, 2015:  please note that I have been receiving reports from patients that Hallwang Clinic’s services are not meeting expectations and Grace Gawler no longer runs Medi-Tours to Hallwang.  Therefore, before you go to Hallwang, please get it in writing that the oncologist and Prof Vogl will be there throughout your stay.

Think of a desert island filled with survivors of a shipwreck.  Life is filled with challenges.  In the midst of this stress, there is conflict.  These survivors have one goal in common: to stay alive.

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Hallwang clinic

Just like the desert island survivors, there is one goal in a German cancer clinic:  to stay alive.  The weeks spent in the clinic are crammed full of treatments in order to beat the cancer.  There may be challenges from the side-effects of the treatments.

Under these challenging circumstances, it would take a saint to remain calm and joyful 100% of the time.

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