Best of Breast: news for week ending 21 November 2014

New developments in the world of cancer and breast cancer, aggregated from Google Alerts, for the week ending 21 November, 2014.

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image credit: YouTube.com

1.  Cannabis extracts can ‘dramatically slow’ growth of brain cancer tumours, new research suggests

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/cannabis-extracts-can-dramatically-slow-growth-of-brain-cancer-tumours-9863097.html

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Best of Breast: news for week ending 29 August 2014

The latest news from the world of Breast Cancer and Cancer, aggregated from Google Alerts, for the week ending 29 August 2014.

Last week’s Best of Breast (week ending 22 August 2014) highlighted the issue of screening, or over-screening of breast cancer, and the dangers of high levels of cumulative radiotherapy as a result of Pet-CTs.  According to an article this week, European hospitals are using a variety of scanning methods, including breast MRIs.  That’s news to me.  About a month back, when I asked my surgeon for an MRI instead of a Pet-CT [as I’d had 4 in the past year] he expressed ignorance of this method of screening for breast cancer.  Back to the drawing board … [Update 24 Sept 2014 – miracle of miracles – in a recent consultation, I asked if a Pet-CT should be done at this stage, and was told … let’s see about an MRI!!???  So if you’re reading this, print off the chart about radiation levels and unless you need a Pet CT for staging, please ask for an MRI instead]

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Funny how no-one ever asks for the Cure for Cancer …

This week’s can of worms is the debate on whether or not cancer is curable or not.  A scientist who has done research into a primitive life form claims that cancer has been around since the dawn of time, and because of that, it is designed by evolution to survive, rather like the cellular version of a cockroach.

Another scientist echoes this view, and believes that we should stop trying to cure cancer, instead treating it as a chronic disease, or better still, trying to prevent it, or even try to slow down its onset using drugs like aspirin.

[Update 24 September.  Please check out these links on aspirin which were kindly sent to me by a reader:

Aspirin pharmacokinetics – sepia.unil.ch/pharmacology/index.php?id=83
Useful “reverse guide” of food high in Salicylate – salicylatesensitivity.com/about/food-guide/]

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Best of Breast: news for week ending 17 January 2014

A summary of  Google Alerts for Breast Cancer and Cancer for the week ending 17 January 2014.

In previous posts, I’ve bemoaned the fact that scientists have already found cures for cancer, but unfortunately they are only at the premature rat-and-mouse trial stage.

This week, it’s the turn of the naked mole rat to take centre-stage. As you can see, it’s not going to win prizes for its looks, but I don’t care – I wish I were a naked mole rat.

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I may be ugly and I lisp, but I’ll never get canther!  (photo of naked mole rat)

Metastasis is the theme this week.

Scientists discover how cancer cells can turn themselves into brain cells to evade capture, and in yet another example of how evil and sneaky they are, transform into brain tumours.  It explains how people in remission can later develop brain tumours.  (Not helpful for the millions of women who already have brain tumours, but may lead to the development of treatments that will prevent such metastasis in other breast cancer patients.)

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