Recurrence Rollercoaster – #2 The GcMAF route (and why you should always kick the tyres of any cure)

A quick re-cap for newcomers to this blog:  I was diagnosed with breast cancer (Stage 1) and spent approximately 1.5 years doing alternative treatments, but the tumour kept growing so I had a mastectomy.  I woke up from the mastectomy to find my left arm paralysed and numb due to  nerve damage (to the brachial plexus) caused by tractioning of the arm during the mastectomy.  I had to have further surgery to release the nerve and because of that, I had no conventional adjuvant treatment.  Nine months after the mastectomy, I finally regained use of my arm.  Nine months after the mastectomy, the cancer recurred.  This is a summary of the options I was exploring after the recurrence.

I’m going to try to update my blog more often.  I regularly check the other cancer blogs I follow and start getting antsy when I don’t see any recent updates.  I’ve also had readers e-mail me with a polite: “How are you?” which reading between the lines, seem to me to also be asking: “are you still alive?”

It must feel as if I am dragging out the whole recurrence and cancer journey story.  But I find it painful sometimes, relieving what happened and the humps and bumps along the way that have derailed me.  Early on I made a choice to write in retrospect so that I would have the wisdom and perspective of distance to give me objectivity.  But doing so has meant that I’ve lost a lot of the immediacy of the moment and have to rely on medical reports on e-mails.  Fortunately I kept very detailed e-mails.

This post is about my visit to a clinic which used a form of GcMAF called Goleic.  The clinic has since been shut down and I do not think that the company who was running the clinic, ImmuneBiotech, is running any more clinics (thank god).  It’s also a post about smoke-and-mirrors, and needing to kick the tyres of any cancer treatment that purports to be a cure.

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Hallwang Clinic #15 – Some lessons learned and helpful tips

Hallwang3

The bus-stop at Hallwang

Updated March 2016 – For more information on GcMAF, please join the GcMAF and GcMAF Cancer forums on Facebook – they are closed groups, so you have to wait for your membership to be confirmed.  They contain up-to-date information on sources of GcMAF, and also feedback and contributions  by people who are using GcMAF.

Updated 1 January, 2015 re. the importance of having a companion when you go for the trans-arterial chemoembolisation procedure with Professor Vogl in Frankfurt.

 

Here is a summary of my experiences which includes information on how to get to Hallwang Private Oncology Clinic, accommodation, a few other bits-and-bobs which didn’t fit into the posts I wrote previously, and how to send an enquiry.

Some people have accused me of being biased in favour Hallwang, and it’s true that I haven’t been to any other German cancer clinic, so there may be an element of truth there.

However, my experience at Hallwang was largely positive [apart from encounters with pointy sharp things] and as far as anyone can enjoy an experience in a cancer clinic, I was blessed in my stay there by the magnificent staff, the doctors, and the support, laughs and camaraderie of the patients there.  Had I gone there on my own, it may not have been such an uplifting stay.

Also, I met a few people who had been to other cancer clinics around the world (including other German clinics and Mexican clinics), and they had positive things to say about Hallwang.  One of the patient’s wives, a very gracious Southern-type belle from California with exacting standards said: “My god, Hallwang is like a spa!  If you wanna get cancer, get it at Hallwang!”

It’s therefore up to you, the reader, to do your research if you’re thinking of going to a German cancer clinic.  There are many clinics in Germany, and all of them have their good and bad points, and none is perfect.

23 July 2014:  Before you go to a German cancer clinic, get written confirmation from them that the chief doctor, or an oncologist will be on-site for the length of your stay.  This applies to any clinic which is dependent on a “star” doctor, and Hallwang which is currently going through staffing changes.

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