Hallwang Clinic #16 – Update and good news

I received this comment from a reader who has recently come back from Hallwang.  Thank you for posting the comment, A.S. and for giving me permission to republish it as a post!  It is great news that Hallwang seems to have improved its performance and services, and this reader had a positive experience there, with fantastic results.  I hope this helps other readers who are searching for viable alternatives to treatments:

“Hello there! I also found your blog and read it with great interest! You have really been around and your infos are very helpful for lost ones likes us searching for help-anywhere. I am also reading with great interest your bisforbananas..blog, especially on the Hallwang Clinic.

Interestingly, after a long online search on clinics in Germany, I decided to visit that clinic and just came back two weeks ago, and I think it is important to know that many things have changed since your last post.

I have to admit I was really insecure an6.d nervous before going there because of so many ambivalent posts, but after talking to the doctors there I decided to give it a try-and I feel so blessed and happy I did.

Right now there are 3 oncologists working on alternating shifts, and the medical director is a very innovative and caring doctor-I actually never met someone like him.

As I understand, staff has changed and the doctors from two years ago are gone, but this new team offers a wide range of treatments I have never seen anywhere else-that is the first time I actually have hope and my tumor markers are gone down-according to my previous doctors I should be dead by now!

I also met many very lovely fighters like us, and am touched by their success they achieved due to the treatment here, in my case immunotherapy in form vaccines and antibodies.

My friend Steve that I met here with mets pancreatic cancer is now in complete remission. You should see him!

Having said that, I also have to agree that everybody needs to find his or her right treatment and what is good for me, might not benefit someone else. And no one knows how long the success lasts.

But I am grateful for every month more with my family and seeing my lab results today and feeling the first time alive again I wanted to share this info with you in case you are considering Hallwang as an option.

Good luck to you all, and don´t give up, sometimes you find help where you least expect it.”

Posts like that make my heart glow.  Congratulations, Andrew!  So happy for you!  I pray that you get lasting healing and have a happy and healthy 2016 and for many years to come.

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Save your lives: get your thyroids and port veins checked by ultrasound! (a session with Prof. Marco Ruggiero)

Updated March 2016 – For more information on GcMAF, please join the GcMAF and GcMAF Cancer forums on Facebook – they are closed groups, so you have to wait for your membership to be confirmed.  They contain up-to-date information on sources of GcMAF, and also feedback and contributions  by people who are using GcMAF.

[GcMAF can be obtained from Sansei-Mirai or ImmuneBiotech.  I’ve heard that the Sansei-Mirai product is very potent and stable.]

I was recently privileged to witness Professor Dr. Marco Ruggiero demonstrate his expertise in conducting ultrasound scans (or sonography as it is known on Continental Europe).

I was familiar with ultrasounds conducted on tumours, but in the hands of a master, it can reveal conditions not clinically evident in blood tests, thus providing an early signpost for more in-depth testing and treatment.

Thyroid ultrasound

Image credit: endocrinesurgery.ucla.edu

I’ve previously always posted about Professor Ruggiero as the genius behind GcMAF.  He is also a trained clinical radiologist and uses ultrasound to measure the success of GcMAF treatments.  This was the first time I saw him demonstrate his mastery in ultrasound scans.

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Happy 2014 – lessons learned in 2013

Updated March 2016 – For more information on GcMAF, please join the GcMAF and GcMAF Cancer forums on Facebook – they are closed groups, so you have to wait for your membership to be confirmed.  They contain up-to-date information on sources of GcMAF, and also feedback and contributions  by people who are using GcMAF.

Updated 10 Jan 2014 – previously “Happy Christmas and 2014”

Updated 22 Feb 2014:  please note that the process for culturing Maf314 is different from Bravo Probiotic.  I am therefore unable to offer any cultures because I suspect my Maf314 culture is no longer viable.  I suggest that if you want to start, you buy a fresh set of cultures from Bravo as only they can guarantee the activity of the cultures.  Compound 1 must be cultured afresh from powder each time.  Compound 2 can be re-propagated from the existing culture.  

Here is the link to Bravo Probiotic:  http://www.bravoprobiotic.com/

And for further information on GcMAF and Maf314:  http://www.gcmaf.eu/

Happy 2014 to all my friends and family.

It’s been a year when the rug’s been constantly pulled from under my feet.  So thank you for seeing me through a challenging year.

It was a year in which I found a voice through this blog, I also met Grace Gawler who is a wise and generous cancer strategist who has held my hand throughout 2013, and been an integral partner in my journey.

To my friends on the cancer journey – may this year bring you NED and good health and loads of money for and success in all the treats and treatments you may need.

********

Winter at Hallwang video

(Here’s a short video I found, that I took from my room at Hallwang – the magic of the soft, falling snow and wintry scene in the Black Forest seems apt for this festive message)

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Hallwang Clinic #15 – Some lessons learned and helpful tips

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The bus-stop at Hallwang

Updated March 2016 – For more information on GcMAF, please join the GcMAF and GcMAF Cancer forums on Facebook – they are closed groups, so you have to wait for your membership to be confirmed.  They contain up-to-date information on sources of GcMAF, and also feedback and contributions  by people who are using GcMAF.

Updated 1 January, 2015 re. the importance of having a companion when you go for the trans-arterial chemoembolisation procedure with Professor Vogl in Frankfurt.

 

Here is a summary of my experiences which includes information on how to get to Hallwang Private Oncology Clinic, accommodation, a few other bits-and-bobs which didn’t fit into the posts I wrote previously, and how to send an enquiry.

Some people have accused me of being biased in favour Hallwang, and it’s true that I haven’t been to any other German cancer clinic, so there may be an element of truth there.

However, my experience at Hallwang was largely positive [apart from encounters with pointy sharp things] and as far as anyone can enjoy an experience in a cancer clinic, I was blessed in my stay there by the magnificent staff, the doctors, and the support, laughs and camaraderie of the patients there.  Had I gone there on my own, it may not have been such an uplifting stay.

Also, I met a few people who had been to other cancer clinics around the world (including other German clinics and Mexican clinics), and they had positive things to say about Hallwang.  One of the patient’s wives, a very gracious Southern-type belle from California with exacting standards said: “My god, Hallwang is like a spa!  If you wanna get cancer, get it at Hallwang!”

It’s therefore up to you, the reader, to do your research if you’re thinking of going to a German cancer clinic.  There are many clinics in Germany, and all of them have their good and bad points, and none is perfect.

23 July 2014:  Before you go to a German cancer clinic, get written confirmation from them that the chief doctor, or an oncologist will be on-site for the length of your stay.  This applies to any clinic which is dependent on a “star” doctor, and Hallwang which is currently going through staffing changes.

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Hallwang Clinic #13 – Whole-body hyperthermia

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Outside the clinic, snow lay thickly on the ground.  Inside, I lay under hot lamps, my core temperature raised to 39 degrees.  The doctor wiped my forehead with washcloths dipped into the snow from the balcony.  How cool was that?

This was my introduction to whole-body hyperthermia, two days after the trans-arterial chemoembolisation (TACE) treatment.

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Hallwang Clinic #11 – Meltdowns, downtime and handholding

Update 5 February, 2015:  please note that I have been receiving reports from patients that Hallwang Clinic’s services are not meeting expectations and Grace Gawler no longer runs Medi-Tours to Hallwang.  Therefore, before you go to Hallwang, please get it in writing that the oncologist and Prof Vogl will be there throughout your stay.

Think of a desert island filled with survivors of a shipwreck.  Life is filled with challenges.  In the midst of this stress, there is conflict.  These survivors have one goal in common: to stay alive.

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Hallwang clinic

Just like the desert island survivors, there is one goal in a German cancer clinic:  to stay alive.  The weeks spent in the clinic are crammed full of treatments in order to beat the cancer.  There may be challenges from the side-effects of the treatments.

Under these challenging circumstances, it would take a saint to remain calm and joyful 100% of the time.

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Hallwang Clinic #10 – Oncovirus/Antisense treatment

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Epstein Barr Virus

Updated 18 April 2014 re. Antisense treatment

 

 

(please note that I was under the assumption that the anti-viral treatment at Hallwang was the same as their Antisense treatment – this may not be the case, hence this re-write.  With many thanks to SH who drew this to my attention)

Antivirus Treatment

Numerous studies have now shown that some cancers can be caused by viruses.

These viruses insert themselves into the DNA of cells, and start replicating.  They turn off the cell’s protective mechanisms and cause the cells to divide without stopping.  The result is the same as cancer which is caused by uncontrolled cell growth.

Or they may damage chromosomes during the cell’s replication, resulting in powerful gene promoters which trigger oncogenes.

Viruses linked to cancer include:

Hallwang Clinic #8 – the diet dilemma

As you can see from the photos below, the food at Hallwang was very good.  Too good in fact.

Cake Tray

Daily freshly-baked cakes (before the men got to it!)

There were three chefs working shifts who cooked haute cuisine-standard, three-course meals to order.  Breakfast was anything you liked. There was even room service for those staying at the clinic and who didn’t want to eat in the restaurant.  There was an open supply of biscuits and fruit for in-between meals.

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Hallwang Clinic #7 – look ma – no veins! PICC line to the rescue

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PICC line/central venous line (after removal) with two lumens

Because of a series of high dose IV C infusions, my veins were non-existent or brittle as they hadn’t been flushed with saline after each session of IV C.

I had one or two faithful and hardworking veins which I trotted out whenever I needed blood tests or infusions.  But they were getting tough and bruised.  One of them was also in an awkward position, on the underside of the arm, next to the elbow.  Getting to it required advance yoga practice.

My experiences with IV C had included 5 attempts to find a vein.  So as you can imagine, I wasn’t looking forward to the multiple sharp-and-pointy experiences that awaited me at Hallwang.

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Hallwang Clinic #6 – boosting the immune system with infusions

Infusion

Updated 15 December 2013 with information on where to purchase Hepa-Mertz if you are living in the UK

One thing was sure, the clinic moved fast.  There wasn’t a day when I wasn’t doing treatments or infusions.  Five hours after I arrived I was hooked up to infusions.

Infusions are a way of introducing supplements and boosters intravenously.  They are very effective because they go straight into the bloodstream, where the body can immediately use them.

The infusions themselves weren’t expensive averaging Euro20 for a combination e.g Zinc, Vitamin C, Hepa-Mertz (a liver detox), Glutathione.  Compare this to the cost of a single dose of IV C in the UK at £150-£200, and it was like being in a candy store.

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