“It’s not the end, it’s just the beginning …”

Caption:  Peter Trayhurn and his famous Lost-At-Sea experience.  Video: courtesy of Marcus O’Brien

I first met Peter Trayhurn at the Hallwang clinic in Germany.

I was sitting in the dining room at the clinic, when in strode this incredibly tall man who commandeered himself a place at the table and started chatting confidently to everyone and criticising some cancer treatments he’d been researching.

I asked him who he was, and his reply was:  “Pete … Peter Trayhurn.”

He obviously expected some form of recognition from me, and when I looked blankly at him, he added (with that characteristic confidence that I would come to recognise as one of his traits) before he made a dramatic exit: “read my blog.”

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Please pray for my friend, Peter Trayhurn

Now more than ever, my friend, Peter Trayhurn, needs your prayers.

I first met Peter (an Australian) at Hallwang, the German oncology clinic, in 2013.  He went there with Stage 4 Colo-rectal cancer, having been given six months to live by his oncologist in Australia.  His cancer vanished within six weeks’ of treatment, only to rear its head again when he returned to Australia.

Since then, he’s been playing a painful game of whack-a-mole with the cancer.

What’s remarkable is that Peter has outlived most of his doctors’ worse predictions.  He’s outlived most of his friends on cancer forums.  And he’s done so with a very good quality of life.  He’s driven himself all over Germany, flown all over the world in the search for cures, gone scuba diving, lived on an ashram and done yoga.  And been a father and husband.

He’s also the author of a blog:  http://petertrayhurn.blogspot.co.uk/.  It’s a step-by-step account of his cancer journey.  It’s full of infuriating typos and spellos, but it is also full of the latest treatments.  It’s full of his zest of life.  And I can vouch for the fact that the positivity and optimism in his posts is real and authentic, and not a mask.  I think he’s the closest I’ve come to a genuine cancer saint.

A few weeks ago, his condition worsened when he was in Australia.  He was throwing up non-stop and wasn’t absorbing nutrients. I managed to persuade him to Skype me when he was in hospital.  I saw how bad he was.  He was in agony throughout the call despite morphine.

I whispered nervously to him:  “Is this the end?”

He looked into the screen and a small smile lit up his face.

“No, I think it’s just the beginning,” he said.

Please pray for my friend Peter.  Now more than ever, he needs your prayers.  And please also pray for his family.  For his children, who cry every night in their beds.  For his wife.  For his doctors to make the right decisions.  Pray that he pulls through the surgery to help him eat, that his guts heal, that the pain lessens, that he manages to eat, that the cancer vanishes.

Please pray.  Because the world needs more people like Peter to show us how to remain human despite the inhuman trials.   Who can pull smiles out of pain.

****

http://petertrayhurn.blogspot.co.uk/

Mastectomy #8B – when disaster strikes … swan with a broken wing … a friend’s support

I had a mastectomy.

The unexpected happens.

I suffer nerve damage. I lose the use of my left arm.

It’s too painful to write about the experience.

BrokenWing

Swan with a broken wing

Please read this post by Peter Trayhurn who tells it better.

http://petertrayhurn.blogspot.co.uk/2013/07/the-swan-with-broken-wing.html

To be understood at this level and to have such a public show of sympathy … thank you, Peter!

Happy 2014 – lessons learned in 2013

Updated March 2016 – For more information on GcMAF, please join the GcMAF and GcMAF Cancer forums on Facebook – they are closed groups, so you have to wait for your membership to be confirmed.  They contain up-to-date information on sources of GcMAF, and also feedback and contributions  by people who are using GcMAF.

Updated 10 Jan 2014 – previously “Happy Christmas and 2014”

Updated 22 Feb 2014:  please note that the process for culturing Maf314 is different from Bravo Probiotic.  I am therefore unable to offer any cultures because I suspect my Maf314 culture is no longer viable.  I suggest that if you want to start, you buy a fresh set of cultures from Bravo as only they can guarantee the activity of the cultures.  Compound 1 must be cultured afresh from powder each time.  Compound 2 can be re-propagated from the existing culture.  

Here is the link to Bravo Probiotic:  http://www.bravoprobiotic.com/

And for further information on GcMAF and Maf314:  http://www.gcmaf.eu/

Happy 2014 to all my friends and family.

It’s been a year when the rug’s been constantly pulled from under my feet.  So thank you for seeing me through a challenging year.

It was a year in which I found a voice through this blog, I also met Grace Gawler who is a wise and generous cancer strategist who has held my hand throughout 2013, and been an integral partner in my journey.

To my friends on the cancer journey – may this year bring you NED and good health and loads of money for and success in all the treats and treatments you may need.

********

Winter at Hallwang video

(Here’s a short video I found, that I took from my room at Hallwang – the magic of the soft, falling snow and wintry scene in the Black Forest seems apt for this festive message)

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Fulda conference 2013 #1: Integrative cancer conference

Updated March 2016 – For more information on GcMAF, please join the GcMAF and GcMAF Cancer forums on Facebook – they are closed groups, so you have to wait for your membership to be confirmed.  They contain up-to-date information on sources of GcMAF, and also feedback and contributions  by people who are using GcMAF.

Updated 28 Dec 2013

Here are the highlights of the integrative cancer conference I attended on 30 November and 1 December, 2013, in Fulda, Germany.  I will be writing individual posts on each topic.

First a huge-thank you to Dr Heinz Reinwald for letting me and Peter Trayhurn attend this conference, and also for giving us his time and consideration, and a discount on the conference fees.

(I’m not sure what the practitioners made of having two patients in their midst, but we were very discrete and were there on a fact-finding mission to find out what was the latest in integrative approaches to cancer, and to suss out which were the doctors who were doing leading-edge research.)

I was impressed by the organisation of the conference.  The conference hotel was luxurious, the room was comfortable, and there were German-English translators as the majority of the talks was in German.  The food at mealtimes was fantastic, four-star buffets with plenty of ketogenic diet options.  Everyone was friendly, which was very important for me.  The quality of the speakers was excellent, world-class, and if I had the money I would go again next year.  It was a bit of a steep learning curve for me at times – if you are a patient and interested in next year’s conference, I suggest that you bone up on the causes of cancer.  If you have a degree in biochemistry that would be helpful as some of the lectures are fairly technical!

Now that I’ve been going through my notes, my overall impression is that the conference was a good mix of providing new information on approaches to cancer treatments, as well as showcasing the products of the sponsor, Dr Reinwald, in particular, Master Amino Acid Pattern (MAP) without being too much of a hard-sell.

Getting information that is not available on websites is not easy where cancer treatments are concerned – so much depends on where you are looking, and a lot of research is still not readily available.  So to be in the midst of practitioners who are sharing their knowledge, backed up by hard-core research and trials, was immensely valuable – thank you, Dr Reinwald!  And to be able to get together world-class practitioners speaks volumes for Dr Reinwald’s reputation and organisation and products.

Conference for Integrative Medicine in Fulda

ChristmasMarket1

The Christmas market at Fulda

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