Wow! Easy Kit – the new, easier, faster way of making Bravo Probiotic!

Updated March 2016 – For more information on GcMAF, please join the GcMAF and GcMAF Cancer forums on Facebook – they are closed groups, so you have to wait for your membership to be confirmed.  They contain up-to-date information on sources of GcMAF, and also feedback and contributions  by people who are using GcMAF.

If you’ve read my posts on Bravo Probiotic (aka GcMAF yoghurt, and previously known as Maf314 yoghurt), you’ve probably wondered at the time-consuming process to make it.  I liken the process to musical chairs with yoghurt.

https://bisforbananascisforcancer.wordpress.com/2013/09/04/supplement-gcmaf-yoghurt-with-thanks-to-peter-trayhurn/

https://bisforbananascisforcancer.wordpress.com/2014/03/18/bravo-probiotic-gcmaf-yoghurt-maf314-someone-find-me-a-camel/

GcMAF Success

The old way of making Bravo Probiotic (GcMaf yoghurt/Maf 314)

Well, I think I’m excited as I’ll ever be – the gods at Bravo Probiotic have heard my cries and come up with a new, improved version, called Easy Kit.

Like it says on the tin, Easy Kit puts the EASY back into yoghurt making.

Making the old version of Bravo Probiotic Continue reading

GcMAF (Maf314) cheese

Updated March 2016 – For more information on GcMAF, please join the GcMAF and GcMAF Cancer forums on Facebook – they are closed groups, so you have to wait for your membership to be confirmed.  They contain up-to-date information on sources of GcMAF, and also feedback and contributions  by people who are using GcMAF.

I reported at the start of the year that I had a glut of GcMAF yoghurt, and offered it to anyone who wanted some, but there were no takers.

GcMAFCheese0

Help! I’m drowning in GcMAF yoghurt!

The thought of pouring all that goodness down the drain broke my heart, so I had a brainwave, and decided to turn it into a drained cheese, and ice-cream.  I went onto the internet, and found several recipes for kefir cheese, and it looked fairly easy to make.

GcMAF Cheese is not cheese made with rennet. Instead, it’s the equivalent of cottage cheese, made by draining the yoghurt through fine muslin and a strainer, so that the solids get left behind.  I used three layers of muslin or cheesecloth (I boiled the cheesecloth and washed it to make sure I got all unwanted residue out).

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The start of GcMAF Cheese. GcMAF yoghurt poured into a strainer lined with a triple layer of cheesecloth.

I let it drain over several days, adding more whenever the level dropped – the resulting ball contains about 2 litres of concentrated GcMAF yoghurt.   The whey collected in the bowl underneath and I drank that.

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GcMAF cheese after several days of draining and topping up.

I then chopped up chives, and added crushed garlic and seasoned it with salt, pepper and olive oil.

GcMAFCheese3

The “cheese” has the texture of Philadephia cheese spread.  It is slightly tangy, with a little whiff, but not as pongy as goat’s cheese and should work well as a dip for carrot and celery sticks.  Or just imagine spreading that cool softness on a piece of hot buttery toast … umm.

Update 25 Jan 2014 – someone in the household ate the whole bowl of GcMAF cheese in one day, and reported that it made him feel sick, and he also got the squits – well, serve him right for being so piggy!  It just shows how potent GcMAF is!

[next episode – GcMAF ice-cream and blueberry compote]

Fulda conference 2013 #1: Integrative cancer conference

Updated March 2016 – For more information on GcMAF, please join the GcMAF and GcMAF Cancer forums on Facebook – they are closed groups, so you have to wait for your membership to be confirmed.  They contain up-to-date information on sources of GcMAF, and also feedback and contributions  by people who are using GcMAF.

Updated 28 Dec 2013

Here are the highlights of the integrative cancer conference I attended on 30 November and 1 December, 2013, in Fulda, Germany.  I will be writing individual posts on each topic.

First a huge-thank you to Dr Heinz Reinwald for letting me and Peter Trayhurn attend this conference, and also for giving us his time and consideration, and a discount on the conference fees.

(I’m not sure what the practitioners made of having two patients in their midst, but we were very discrete and were there on a fact-finding mission to find out what was the latest in integrative approaches to cancer, and to suss out which were the doctors who were doing leading-edge research.)

I was impressed by the organisation of the conference.  The conference hotel was luxurious, the room was comfortable, and there were German-English translators as the majority of the talks was in German.  The food at mealtimes was fantastic, four-star buffets with plenty of ketogenic diet options.  Everyone was friendly, which was very important for me.  The quality of the speakers was excellent, world-class, and if I had the money I would go again next year.  It was a bit of a steep learning curve for me at times – if you are a patient and interested in next year’s conference, I suggest that you bone up on the causes of cancer.  If you have a degree in biochemistry that would be helpful as some of the lectures are fairly technical!

Now that I’ve been going through my notes, my overall impression is that the conference was a good mix of providing new information on approaches to cancer treatments, as well as showcasing the products of the sponsor, Dr Reinwald, in particular, Master Amino Acid Pattern (MAP) without being too much of a hard-sell.

Getting information that is not available on websites is not easy where cancer treatments are concerned – so much depends on where you are looking, and a lot of research is still not readily available.  So to be in the midst of practitioners who are sharing their knowledge, backed up by hard-core research and trials, was immensely valuable – thank you, Dr Reinwald!  And to be able to get together world-class practitioners speaks volumes for Dr Reinwald’s reputation and organisation and products.

Conference for Integrative Medicine in Fulda

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The Christmas market at Fulda

Continue reading

Supplement: GcMAF yoghurt — Maf 314 — Bravo Probiotic

GcMAF Success

GcMAF yoghurt success!
MAF314 (large jar left), Compound 2 (large jar right), Compound 1 (small jars front)

Updated March 2016 – For more information on GcMAF, please join the GcMAF and GcMAF Cancer forums on Facebook – they are closed groups, so you have to wait for your membership to be confirmed.  They contain up-to-date information on sources of GcMAF, and also feedback and contributions  by people who are using GcMAF.

Update 8 May 2014: Bravo Probiotics (the maker of GcMAF yoghurt) now have a new EasyKit that contains powdered colostrum – it signficantly cuts the time needed to make the yoghurt and also the cost of the yoghurt as liquid colostrum is very expensive.

Updated 22 March with new, cheaper source of liquid colostrum in the UK

Updated 16 March 2014 with information on yoghurt makers, and links to more recent posts on Bravo Probiotic

Updated 20 Feb 2014:  Please note that there is a difference between the propagating process for Maf 314 and Bravo Probiotic.  For Bravo:  Compound 1 must be cultured afresh each time from the powder and not from the yoghurt.  Compound 1 contains GcMAF.  Compound 2 can have a life-cycle of up to 8 weeks.  Therefore it is necessary to buy the Bravo Probiotic culture if you want to do this properly, you can’t rely on a culture that is a year old (like I have).  I highly-recommend buying a culture from Bravo – that way, you know that the GcMAF and probiotics are active.

Updated 26 January 2014 with more photos about the ideal vs the actual real-life process of making GcMAF yoghurt, and observations from the Fulda Integrative Conference 2013.

And there are 3 videos on how to make Bravo Probiotic, check out:  http://www.bravoprobiotic.com/index.php/storage-of-products/9-sezione1/6-2-how-to-prepare-bravo-probiotic

See also my post (March 2014):  GCMAF AT WORK — BRAVO PROBIOTIC — MYTHS OF THE DANGERS OF DAIRY PRODUCTS FOR CANCER PATIENTS (A TALK BY PROF. MARCO RUGGIERO)

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I’ve blogged previously about GcMAF, a protein in our immune system.

GcMAF stands for glycoprotein macrophage activating factor.

GcMAF activates macrophages (white blood cells that eat cancer cells).    However, viruses and malignant cells like cancer send out an enzyme called Nagalase that blocks production of GcMAF.

Continue reading